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Sarah at Christmas

Monday, January 28, 2013


Wonderful Diversions

Time has brought a bit of sadness my way these past few weeks. Although I’ve continued to edit my work in progress, Sarah: Laney’s Angel, I decided it would be beneficial to retreat and read—an escape to literature always brings me relief.  And therefore I bolted from routine.  This last week or so, I’ve read the following books.  You will enjoy each of them. A laugh or two awaits you; maybe a tear or two, but most of all, you will find God between the pages.

All are fast breaks from busy days.  The Shack, listed at the end, is not a romance, but eighteen million people agree with me—it is a noble study.

I love all the covers.  Don’t you?  When I decided to give myself a break, I chose titles with fantastic art work, and the inside stories didn’t disappoint.
 

 Trinity Hart’s opening chapter to an Accident Waiting to Happen captured my interest and continued to hold it until I finished the novel.   My Kindle went crazy during the read, and I wanted to throw the thing against the wall.   I’d guessed the mystery, but I could hardly wait to discover if I was right.

Hope Pearson’s would-be killer rigged her brakes and caused her car to careen out of control.  Caleb McBryde, a former Texas Ranger, and a hunk with a scar on his face as well as one in his soul, stumbles into Hope’s life as a result of the accident. Can Hope find her way back to God? After all, He disappointed her. Will Caleb overcome his fear? How can Hope love a disfigured man?

Hart weaves valuable Christian insights into the undertaking without overload on the preachy stuff.

The author doesn’t “tell” a story, she “shows” one.  Since my goal in writing fiction is to “show,” I look for books such as an Accident Waiting to Happen.  I will browse this one a second time and I hope to discover more of Hart’s work.

 


Mary Ball’s Escape to Big Fork Lake is another book with intrigue and Christian romance. Samantha Blacker, also known as Sam, receives an unexpected inheritance. The unforeseen bequest requires Sam, a city girl, to move to a small, country town in Alabama. Sam falls in love with the inn on the lake, and if she lives here for a year, it remains hers.

With no place in her heart for God, a newfound, romantic, friend, Noah Frye patiently turns Sam’s thoughts toward Him. Oops!  Wait a minute.  Sam is framed for murder.   How could God let such a thing happen?  What will this do to Sam’s budding romance with a mortal and her potential relationship to God?

Who among us doesn’t want an astonishing endowment from a kind benefactor?  Only in creative writing does it usually happen, but we can all hope, anyway. Ball has taken a wish many of us have—to start over in a romantic, gorgeous place, and added a nightmare—murder.  

 


Donna and Mark Duboise are Christian gospel singers who face trauma and marital discord.  Through a mission trip, God brings Donna back to a restored relationship to Him and her husband. The difficult work of a missionary, even a temporary one, is brilliantly described in these chapters. However, the rewards of such effort are detailed also.

The Christmas Answer is a story within a story.  Jackson shows how God works all things to our good. The reader will find encouragement in The Christmas Answer. What we do in our everyday world touches others—and we may never know the merits of a word or deed, until eternity, that is.

 


A widow, Celina Innes, and her four-year old daughter live above her dress shop in Aspen, Colorado. The year is 1886, a difficult era for a lone female entrepreneur. Mikel, co-owner of Toussaint’s General Store, and a recent arrival to the United States, admires Celina and adores the child. Keena, the young daughter, suddenly develops an illness. Mikel is able to help, and Celina realizes her love and need for him. This hero demonstrates his character with actions, and provides pure romance to a reader.

Carroll-Bradd weaves an effective adventure into a novella.  The friendship between Mikel and Celina moves along to a fast completion without leaving one feeling as though something was missing—a difficult process in shorter literature.

A surprise to me? The price of a wedding ring in 1886. 
 
A Change of Style
The Shack breaks away from the Romance Genre, but I recommend this one as well.

Product Details

After seeing the author interviewed, I decided to read his book again. I loved it the first interval and the interview revealed facets I might have missed.  Here are a few aspects that came to mind with this second reading.

God establishes a love relationship with us.

Forgiveness is a must in our lives.

God hates hypocrisy—especially in the established church.
 

On My To Read List


I look forward to this one.  I read Kim McMahill’s Marked in Mexico, and it was a real page turner.  Big Horn Storm promises the same.

My Books


Available now through bookstores and Amazon.


To be released this Spring by Prism Book Group